Check out the latest books at Jervis library

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Jervis Public Library, 613 N. Washington St., is once again open to the public! Face masks and social distancing are required.

Library hours are 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Monday to Thursday; 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday; and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday.

The library has 110,000 books; nearly 20,000 digital books and audiobooks via OverDrive’s Libby app (midyork.overdrive.com); 4,500 DVDs; 6,000 books on CD; nearly 200 magazines and newspapers; and 155 digital magazines.

Borrow unique items including disc golf kits, karaoke machine and CDs, DVD player, VCR, and Kill-a-Watt meter. The library also offers meeting rooms, licensed Notary Public, and one-on-one tech help — call ahead for availability. Access all this with a free library card. To get your library card, bring in identification with your current address. Call 315-336-4570, e-mail askJPL@jervislibrary.org, or go online to www.jervislibrary.org or www.facebook.com/jervispubliclibrary for more information.

Events

* registration required

Monday, Nov. 15, Adult Craft Kit and free Children’s Craft Kits available

Tuesday, Nov. 16, 5 p.m., Unplug & Play Game Night

Wednesday, Nov. 17, 10:30 a.m., Story Time with Ms. Emily; 4:30 p.m., Virtual Teen Event: Science

Thursday, Nov. 18, 3 p.m., Color Your Plate with Fruits and Veggies *

Friday, Nov. 19, 3:15 p.m., Local Author Book Signing: Dying to Live: Messages from the Beyond by Charlene Emeterio

Saturday, Nov. 20, 11 a.m., in-person teen event, Bananagrams Challenge; 1 p.m., Author Talk & Book Signing: “Open House” by Chuck D’Imperio

Did you know?

American astronaut Eileen Marie Collins was born on Nov. 19, 1956. Chosen to be part of the Space Shuttle program while attending Air Force Test Pilot School, she was the first woman to pilot and then to command a U.S. space shuttle. During the 1990s, she spent more than 537 hours in space.

For more information, check out Women in Space: 23 Stories of First Flights, Scientific Missions, and Gravity-Breaking Adventures by Gibson.

Read all about it

Top Titles

“The Boys: A Memoir of Hollywood and Family” by Ron Howard and Clint Howard. From William Morrow.

“What was it like to grow up on TV?” Ron Howard has been asked this question throughout his adult life. in The Boys, he and his younger brother, Clint, examine their childhoods in detail for the first time. For Ron, playing Opie on The Andy Griffith Show and Richie Cunningham on Happy Days offered fame, joy, and opportunity—but also invited stress and bullying. For Clint, a fast start on such programs as Gentle Ben and Star Trek petered out in adolescence, with some tough consequences and lessons.

With the perspective of time and success—Ron as a filmmaker, producer, and Hollywood A-lister, Clint as a busy character actor—the Howard brothers delve deep into an upbringing that seemed normal to them yet was anything but. 

“Lore Olympus: Volume One” by Rachel Smythe.  From Del Rey.

Persephone, young goddess of spring, is new to Olympus. Her mother, Demeter, has raised her in the mortal realm, but after Persephone promises to train as a sacred virgin, she’s allowed to live in the fast-moving, glamorous world of the gods. When her roommate, Artemis, takes her to a party, her entire life changes: she ends up meeting Hades and feels an immediate spark with the charming yet misunderstood ruler of the Underworld. Now Persephone must navigate the confusing politics and relationships that rule Olympus, while also figuring out her own place—and her own power.

This full-color edition of Smythe’s original Eisner-nominated webcomic Lore Olympus features a brand-new, exclusive short story, and brings Greek mythology into the modern age in a sharply perceptive and romantic graphic novel.

Kid’s Corner

“A Feast for Joseph” by Terry Farish and OD Bonny.  From Groundwood Books.

When Joseph and Mama lived in a refugee camp in East Africa, everyone cooked and ate together. And Joseph could always hear someone playing the awal. It’s much too quiet and lonely in his new home. Though Whoosh, the girl who lives upstairs, is friendly, Joseph misses having more people around, especially his grandmother, who still lives across the ocean. So he invites his relatives in the city to come for dinner, then he invites his teacher, then Whoosh and her mami — but everyone is too busy.

Ever hopeful, Joseph picks the last greens from the garden. At least he and Mama will be ready to cook if someone comes. The next night Whoosh and her mami appear at the door with a big cake, and Whoosh and Joseph cook up a feast.

“Across the Desert” by Dusti Bowling.  From Little, Brown Books for Young Readers.

Twelve-year-old Jolene spends every day she can at the library watching her favorite livestream: The Desert Aviator, where twelve-year-old “Addie Earhart” shares her adventures flying an ultralight plane over the desert. While watching this daring girl fly through the sky, Jolene can dream of what it would be like to fly with her, far away from her own troubled home life where her mother struggles with a narcotic addiction. And Addie, who is grieving the loss of her father, finds solace in her online conversations with Jolene, her biggest—and only—fan.

Then, one day, it all goes wrong: Addie’s engine abruptly stops, and Jolene watches in helpless horror as the ultralight plummets to the ground and the video goes dark. Jolene knows that Addie won’t survive long in the extreme summer desert heat. With no one to turn to for help and armed with only a hand-drawn map and a stolen cell phone, it’s up to Jolene to find a way to save the Desert Aviator.

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