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Absentee votes are still being counted in some local races

Alexis Manore
Staff writer
email / twitter
Posted 11/16/22

A week after the general election, the Oneida County Board of Elections is still counting absentee votes. While some races have been called, others are still too close to be decided.

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Absentee votes are still being counted in some local races

Posted

UTICA — A week after the general election, the Oneida County Board of Elections is still counting absentee votes. While some races have been called, others are still too close to be decided.

Here are the updated results of several local elections as of 1 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 15:  

State Supreme Court, 5th District 

Christina Cagnina (Democratic) — 20,521   

David Murad (Democratic) — 32,023  

John W. Dillion (Democratic) — 21,967

Charles A. Keller (Democratic) — 20,198

Julie Grow Denton (Republican, Conservative) — 41,879 

Kevin P. Kuehner (Republican, Conservative) — 35,630

William F. Ramseier (Republican, Conservative) — 34,606

Mark Rose (Republican, Conservative) — 37,848 

Oneida County Clerk 

Mary E. Finegan (Republican, Conservative) — 43,449 

Merima Smajic-Oren (Democratic, Working Families) — 21,365

Oneida County Sheriff 

Robert M. Maciol (Democrat, Conservative) — 48,860

James E. Scarchilli (We the People) — 13,059

119th State Assembly District 

Marianne Buttenschon (Democratic, Conservative) — 19,045

John S. Zielinski (Republican) — 14,836

Congress 22nd District

Francis Conole (Democratic) — 27,276 

Brandon Williams (Republican, Conservative) — 45,456

Williams maintains lead

The Associated Press has called the NY-22 race, declaring Williams the winner.

The race for NY-22 has been extremely close, with Williams leading with 132,762 votes, and Conole trailing closely with 128,837 votes. 

Williams declared victory over Conole early in the morning of Wednesday, Nov. 9, despite the fact that not all votes had been counted. Conole has yet to concede and is still waiting for all votes to be counted. 

Conole declined to comment until all of the absentee and affidavit ballots have been counted.

In a Nov. 15 statement, Williams said, “I’d like to offer a special thanks to all the election officials who have worked countless hours to ensure every vote is counted. As the dust from Election Day settles, we are not merely Republicans and Democrats – we are united as Central New Yorkers. I look forward to representing each of our district’s constituents regardless of your party. Together we can restore the economy, attract jobs, and empower communities to reduce crime.”

Williams also thanked Conole for running a strong race and praised him for his military service. Both Conole and Williams are Navy veterans.

“While we offered voters a contrast and shared many disagreements on the campaign trail, we both love CNY and we both love our country,” Williams said in the statement. “I commend him for his military service and providing voters with a choice on Election Day by stepping up to run for office.”

Williams has been accepted into the House of Representatives’ new member orientation and is preparing to represent the people of NY-22 in January.

Grow Denton top vote-getter in race

Attorney Julie Grow Denton, of Rome, was one of four candidates elected to serve as a New York State Supreme Court Justice for the Fifth Judicial District, consisting of Herkimer, Jefferson, Lewis, Oneida, Onondaga and Oswego Counties.

Eight candidates were on the ballot for four seats. According to the state Board of Elections, Denton received the highest tally with 186,597 votes. The other three candidates who will join her on the court are Mark Rose, of Herkimer County with 179,608 votes; Kevin Kuehner, of Onondaga County with 179,010 votes; and Will Ramseier, of Jefferson County, with 168,803 votes.

“I am honored to have been chosen by the constituents of the Fifth Judicial District to serve as one of their Supreme Court Justices and am particularly pleased to have received the highest vote totals from Oneida County,” said Denton. “I have worked hard throughout my career; I worked hard as a candidate; and I will work hard as a judge to earn the pride of our community.”

Denton’s qualifications include graduating with honors from Harvard Law School, receiving “highly qualified” ratings from the Oneida, Onondaga and Central New York Women’s Bar Associations, and being “commended” by the Central New York Women’s Bar Association for her attitude toward gender neutrality and for actively contributing to the promotion of gender equality in the practice of law.

Her candidacy was endorsed by the Veterans Party of Onondaga County, the New York State Troopers PBA, the New York State Police Investigators Association, the Onondaga County Deputy Sheriffs’ Police Association, and the Teamsters Local 317.

A New York State Supreme Court Justice serves a 14-year term.

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